Wouldn’t It Be Nice? pt. 1- Dream Jobs and Mad Libs

I am a  freak for vocabulary. I get a thrill every time I learn a new word or hear a rarely used one. In snobbish form, it gives me a true sense of accomplishment to understand their variety and application in any given sentence.

I wish it were that easy when it came to making sense of small scenarios in the greater picture of life. It would be a lot simpler to find clarity and direction.

Who are you and who or what do you want to become? It’s tricky to figure out a plan of action if you aren’t sure of the desired goal. I say this because I recently had a conversation with a friend about what kind of dancer I’m trying to be- is it classical ballet, contemporary ballet, modern? I’ve wanted to be each of these at separate points.

At a crossroads where are you heading?

I think my path with dance at this point is heading wherever I’m going to be best put to use. I don’t want to strive to be the perfect classical ballerina if that isn’t the best use of my current talents, nor do I want to try to morph myself into a ‘modern’ dancer if my natural movement (not to mention my hyper-extended lumbar spine and limited plie) go against it. I think most of my dance life I have tried to listen to what teachers and directors tell me I’m best at, and pushed myself for that, even if it goes against what is in my heart. I don’t know if this is a good idea or not and I wonder how others dancers- or people in general feel guided in their careers. I just think that there are some things, in all jobs,  that no matter how hard you work you cannot overcome so why not go where you’re needed or best put to use?

In defining myself as a dancer, I don’t value one of these three arts forms over the over, and could see myself being fulfilled and challenged in all three various forms. (Classical, contemporary, modern) I care more about the quality of work and the environment. I think it is- to me- more important to feel happy and stable with the people I work with than to wear a classical tutu. I know that I am not interested in doing sloppy versions of The Nutcracker every year to call myself a ballet dancer, or to push myself to become a modern dancer simply because I enjoy the work of a certain company if that isn’t in the stars for me.

Star Chart via – the clothes horse

At this point- ballet, contemporary, modern- are more like the defining adjectives of ‘dancer’ rather than the nouns. I want to be a great dancer and between these three, I could be happy with any variety.  I pretty much just want to be my personal best, whatever form that takes.

No, not THAT kind!

Wouldn’t it be nice if self-definition were as easy as say, filling in the blanks- Mad libs style?

(The guy I was doodling moved before I could get his face)

1. occupation

2. location (like- the beach/ gas stations/ etc)

3. another location

4. item of clothing

5. activity

6. adjective

7. adjective

8. adjective

9. emotion

10. body part

-‘I LOVE MY JOB- the mad libs

My dream job is to be a (#1). I love being in the (#2) and there is something magical about being at the (#3). I love the idea of donning a (#4) as part of my work uniform, and that my ‘daily grind’ includes (#5). This work makes my body feel (#6), (#7) and (#8) while filling my heart with (#9). More than anything, it nourishes my (#10).

So what are you? Wishing everyone joy and fulfillment in whatever line of work you dojess the…?

7 thoughts on “Wouldn’t It Be Nice? pt. 1- Dream Jobs and Mad Libs

  1. My dream job is to be an accountant. I love being in the swamp and there is something magical about being at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. I love the idea of donning mittens as part of my work uniform, and that my ‘daily grind’ includes hula-hooping. This work makes my body feel vigorous, colorful and freckly while filling my heart with angst. More than anything, it nourishes my knee cap.

  2. My dream job is to be a photographer. I love being in the highway and there is something magical about being at the radio station. I love the idea of donning sweatpants as part of my work uniform, and that my ‘daily grind’ includes jogging. This work makes my body feel smelly, dreamy and sexy while filling my heart with infatuation. More than anything, it nourishes my hand.
    haha 🙂

  3. Ah, I know EXACTLY what you mean. It’s refreshing seeing someone else write what I constantly feel!

    “I think most of my dance life I have tried to listen to what teachers and directors tell me I’m best at, and pushed myself for that, even if it goes against what is in my heart. I don’t know if this is a good idea or not and I wonder how others dancers- or people in general feel guided in their careers.” – I am a dancer too, and I have a similar problem. All my life my teachers have defined what I’m best at, often without giving a range of things a chance. When I was old enough, these teachers stopped giving direct direction, in order for me to find my own path, but the criticism never stopped, so it was so difficult to listen to my head above all the rabble.

    It’s taking a while to listen to my own voice, and as frustrating as that is, if it says dance in the meantime then – dance. Go toward happy and hopefully you’ll find which adjective you want to be… that’s what I’m hoping anyway!!

  4. Hi Crystaldance! I appreciate your comment so very much- what type of dance did you grow up doing and what are you engaging in now? Has it changed? Sometimes I wonder if I’ll ever be able to really (emotionally) let go of the pointe shoes. It’s funny, in college I wanted to spend more time in creative writing classes and I was thoroughly discouraged by my dance teachers and here I am doing it anyways. Sometimes I think our true passions and selves reveal themselves once the ‘people-pleaser’ in us- especially dancers- quiets down. All the best to you 🙂

    • I grew up doing a variety of things – ballet (the WHOLE RAD syllabus, lol), contemporary, jazz… I was part of the core of the grade that featured at concerts and eisteddfods and going onto university was an eye-opener for me. At university I dropped the jazz/commercial aspects and continued on in ballet and contemporary, eventually majoring in all things contemporary.

      I don’t think I’ll ever really ever emotionally let go of pointe shoes – and you know what, I don’t think you need to. Techniques do often blur, especially when you exit the strictly classical sector. I’ve been asked as part of a contemporary performance to donn pointe shoes… it hurt at first, but it’s a technique you never forget (especially after wearing them for ten years!).

      For me now, I’m focusing on contemporary – but I’ve made the move from Australia to the UK – and dance styles here are quite different… contemporary often means balletically influenced…

      I’m still hoping our true passions/selves reveal – it’s often hard to hear the whispers when the commands of so many years were shouting… Good luck to you too though! I look forward to reading more about you and your journey!

  5. In the spirit of true passions/selves… here’s a post I had if you’re interested – it’s me trying to par back the idea of different styles and view myself as primarily a “mover”. In doing so, perhaps a way of moving will reveal itself 😉 I think this is also the fundamentals of why we like to dance – the sensations of moving…

    http://rachelvogel.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/becoming-a-mover/

  6. Pingback: The long and the short of it « Rachel Vogel

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